Biography
My process begins with the development of an image. These images are the basis from which subsequent images arise; reexamined versions of those essential ideas and concepts. In effect, this becomes a reversal of the traditional approach to painting and concept development. Rather than formulating the image through studies and sketches I begin developing the notion within the reexamined painting through the painting process itself. I then take that completed painting and break it down into its essential parts within a new image. This process allows me time to isolate what attracted me to the idea in the first place. The initial painting acts as a springboard or a starting point from which I can expand upon my initial inspiration and to look more closely at what it is that is pushing me forward.

The source material for my paintings comes from the photographs I shoot while in search of subject matter. In doing so I recognize that there are reasons for which I am drawn into these subjects but during this process I do not take the time to expand upon it. That comes later in the process. Once a painting is completed the image content will often have more to say to me. It is from this new information that I gather that a subsequent work may emerge. These works are much rougher and less literal in representation resulting in a painting that is another step in the refinement of my thought process on the subject.

The initial work is vitally important. Without it, without the initial concept or subject, the resultant works may not materialize. When I am photographing my subject matter this first image is known to me almost immediately. As a painting it is meant to stand alone as a subject and idea. This eliminates preparatory sketches which, in the past, can be detrimental to the production of the work. These preparatory sketches have a way of diluting the spontaneity and freshness that I assign to the initial piece. I choose to save that energy and creative process for the painted image. Once this initial painting is complete I continue to apply the development process to the ensuing post-painting image and its resultant work. It is as though painting the first image is an exploration of the initial idea encountered when sourcing the subject matter while creating an new opportunity for additional notions on the subject to be discovered during this examination. Once that idea is known to me by way of painting it I am then more able to take the time to understand what it is that brought me to the subject in the first place.
David Wilson

Breaking

Acrylic on Canvas
48 x 36 inches
2017
[IMG: Breaking]
David Wilson

Days Left Behind

Acrylic on Canvas
36 x 48 inches
2017
[IMG: Days Left Behind]
David Wilson

Moonrise and Cottonwood Tree

Acrylic on Canvas
48 x 36 inches
2017
[IMG: Moonrise and Cottonwood Tree]
David Wilson

Morning on the Lake

Acrylic on Canvas
48 x 60 inches
2017
[IMG: Morning on the Lake]
David Wilson

Separated

Acrylic on Canvas
36 x 36 inches
2017
[IMG: Separated]
David Wilson

Still

Acrylic on Canvas
48 x 48 inches
2017
[IMG: Still]
David Wilson

As Close As We Can Be

Acrylic on Canvas
30 x 90 inches
2015
[IMG: As Close As We Can Be]
David Wilson

As Far As I Could Go

Acrylic on Canvas
36 x 48 inches
2015
[IMG: As Far As I Could Go]
David Wilson

The Deep End

Acrylic on Canvas
60 x 48 inches
2015
[IMG: The Deep End]
David Wilson

When It Is Safe to Go

Acrylic on Canvas
36 x 48 inches
2015
[IMG: When It Is Safe to Go]